Hello - first post-tastic! One arm training

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Adrian
Posts: 2
Joined: 29 Oct 2019, 00:17

29 Oct 2019, 00:24

Just wondering about this.

Let's consider 3 variations: small straddle, deep straddle, and straight legs. Would you train all three when learning or focus on one? Can sort of see benefits of changing the legs and gaining more awareness throughout different planes and shapes but also the benefit of being focused just one one and then moving on to others.
SaschaF
Posts: 1
Joined: 28 Oct 2019, 22:58

29 Oct 2019, 07:56

Hi :-)
I change the leg positions, depending how my flexibility on this exact day is. My straddle flex needs more attention, so just on every other day i feel comfortable to train in straddle . Often in closed position I feel more stable with weightshift and other drills
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Natalie Reckert
Posts: 11
Joined: 17 Sep 2019, 21:14

30 Oct 2019, 12:55

Hello :) first post yay!

So great to see you two here!

I agree you should go with what feels best for your body.

You can decide to focus on only one position, that's often how it is approached in gymnastics, circus or sports acro. People will focus on what they perceive to be the most achievable position. Which makes sense considering that it takes so long to learn a one arm handstand, you might just as well drill only one shape.

I think though that you should keep checking in with the other positions regularly to build strength and sometimes you may find your preference or ability has changed.

In an ideal world you would practice all three positions equally.

The full straddle is the easiest to achieve I think, but straight and v shape allow you to feel the alignment better and can help you build core strength towards holding the one arm.

Have a great handstanding day,
Natalie
mikeferris
Posts: 4
Joined: 31 Oct 2019, 14:41
Location: Kansas City, MO

31 Oct 2019, 14:55

What I find interesting about half Straddle and full positions is that my form isn’t able to “suffer” as much as in full Straddle; I can’t get away with as many mistakes as I can in full Straddle! I also notice that my shoulder position has to be as strong as possible to hold those positions, if not, I’ll either rotate out or just collapse.

With that in mind, I usually train full and half Straddle positions in finger tip support before moving on to full Straddle one arms for time. It’s great in reacquainting my shoulder with the right position and elevation in my practice that day!

Mike
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Natalie Reckert
Posts: 11
Joined: 17 Sep 2019, 21:14

03 Nov 2019, 22:11

Hi Mike,

That's really interesting!

I agree that both straight line and v shape really force you to have a really precise torso alignment and strong shoulder position.

I like the order of doing the more demanding shapes first. I think that's a great habit to keep.

What do you focus on most for keeping your alignment?

Best,
Natalie
mikeferris
Posts: 4
Joined: 31 Oct 2019, 14:41
Location: Kansas City, MO

06 Nov 2019, 16:19

Natalie Reckert wrote:
03 Nov 2019, 22:11
Hi Mike,

That's really interesting!

I agree that both straight line and v shape really force you to have a really precise torso alignment and strong shoulder position.

I like the order of doing the more demanding shapes first. I think that's a great habit to keep.

What do you focus on most for keeping your alignment?

Best,
Natalie
Hi Natalie!

Yes switching up my routine a bit to include those shapes first has really helped, indeed!

The biggest revelation for me personally in one arm training was how important stability in the shoulder is, and how it, or the lack of it, effects everything else like alignment of the pelvis in relation to the shoulder. It really drove home just how important the shoulders are in one arm training.

A few things I focus on most for alignment every session now really just has to do with the support shoulder! If I’m sure the support in my shoulder is there, which for me includes the feeling of being directly over my hand, slight internal rotation of my humerus, and conscious engagement of my rear deltoid to keep that shoulder elevated and in place, then I can focus on corrections at my support hand, and my pelvis manages to stay in place without too much rotation.

That’s kind of the gist of it for now, but I’m always finding something new every session that I can address!

Kindly,

Mike Ferris
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Natalie Reckert
Posts: 11
Joined: 17 Sep 2019, 21:14

11 Nov 2019, 18:14

Hi Mike,

I see, thanks for sharing. I like to hear what people focus on.

It sounds in line with what I tell my students dor weight transfers and one arm practice.

The way I phrase iit is: frieze the shoulder or "brace" for impact, actively expecting the weight when it is transferred and then locking the shoulder.

Best,
Natalie
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